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About Grants

Grants for 2012-13
Grants for 2011-12
Grants for 2010-11
Grants for 2009-10
Grants for 2008-9
Grants for 2007-8

About Grants

EES supports innovative evangelism through two types of grants:

1.  Evangelism for the Twenty-First Century (E-21) Grants

This is the only grant for which applicants apply directly.


Scope
E-21 grants are $500 - $5000 and are intended to help define, encourage and support the emerging forms of lay and ordained ministries that the new century demands. 


Eligibility
E-21 Grants are awarded to Episcopalians in the eleven Episcopal seminary communities, and in seminaries accredited by the Association of Theological Schools.  Students, faculty, staff, and their spouses and partners, are eligible for EES support.


Grant Criteria
E-21 Grants are awarded for projects that focus on one or more of the following objectives.

  • Taking the Gospel to the unchurched
  • Empowering lay and ordained ministers to bring new evangelical vigor to parish churches
  • Helping believers to understand and articulate the Christian faith

Guidelines
EES especially encourages initiatives in evangelism and education that:

  • Connect the academic and professional world of the seminaries to the work carried out by lay and ordained ministers in surrounding communities
  • Foster new initiatives and methodologies
  • Present well-defined goals; state clearly how funds will be used; and show how the project's results can be evaluated
  • May result in pilot programs or models that others can adopt or adapt

Proposals that are approved for E-21 grants must have an immediate evangelical impact for the Episcopal Church, and must be of the applicants' innovation. The following types of projects are ineligible:

  • Pilgrimage, cross cultural immersions, and language immersion programs
  • Internships with established programs
  • Study with other academic institutions
  • Projects whose exclusive benefit is for the applicant's own institution.

The same essential criteria apply to faculty proposals, with the following additional exclusions:

  • Travel and research for publication that is part of regular faculty development
  • Work with established programs
  • Development of course work, participation in institutional partnerships, and development of companion relationships
  • Development of programs for the faculty member's own institution

Faculty proposals should be innovative. The target audience should be wider than the academic, publication and teaching circles in which the applicant usually ministers.

Apply Now 

2.  Special Grants (Program)

 EES is committed to conversation, shared experience, and greater mutuality within the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion.  Two programs are currently supported to that end:

  • The Canterbury Scholars program brings together seminarians from throughout the Anglican Communion for three weeks of study and conversation at Canterbury Cathedral.  A recent participant writes: "The Canterbury program offers an invaluable experience for Anglicans in priestly formation.  Living in Christian community with people from all over the world who have committed themselves to similar vocations was one of the most profound experiences of my life.  In sharing our stories, praying and worship, study and play the presence of Christ was made known in a very real way.  Thus, cross-cultural bonds were made in Christ while our differences were explored, honored and celebrated!"  Click here to Canterbury Scholars.

  • The Seminarian Leadership Conference is an annual fall gathering of student leaders from the eleven Episcopal seminaries.  Participants spend a long weekend together sharing news of their respective institutions, to sharing in fellowship and community building, and participating in leadership seminars.  The conference is hosted by a different seminary each year, giving participants the opportunity to participate in the community life of another institution. Seminarians develop a sense of their Episcopalian identity that transcends seminary, region, and even theological differences.